Associate of Applied Science - Agriculture Technology Management Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Instructional Specialist Karen Smith (928) 717-7760
Professor Justin Brereton (928) 717-7724
Professor Marnee Zazueta (928) 717-7727
Associate Dean Karla Phillips (928) 717-7725
Dean John Morgan (928) 717-7721

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Agriculture Technology Management

The Agriculture Technology Management program prepares students for entrepreneurship, employment, or advancement in a variety of agricultural fields including horticulture, aquaculture and fisheries, and animal care and management.

Note:

 

 

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Agriculture Technology Management Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Design, operate and manage an extensive agriculture facility. (AGS 250, AGS 252, AGS 261, AGS 264)
  2. Rear fish from egg to market using practices for maximizing production and profit. (AGS 261, AGS 264)
  3. Develop a disease and water quality management system. (AGS 261, AGS 264)
  4. Propagate plants from cuttings and seeds. (AGS 250, AGS 252)
  5. Develop and implement an integrated pest management system.(AGS 107, AGS 250, AGS 252)
  6. Recognize and correct irrigation/plumbing/equipment/facility problems. (AGS 250, AGS 252, AGS 261, AGS 264, AGS 274)
  7. Develop and implement a comprehensive management program for exotic and domestic animals. (AGS 280, AGS 282)
 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I. General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1. College Composition or Applied Communication - Select Option a or b:
          a.  Writing (6 credits)
Choose two courses from approved list
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA105 Business English   3
CRW139 Intro to Creative Writing   3
ENG101 College Composition I   3
ENG102 College Composition II   3
ENG103 College Composition I Honors   3
ENG104 College Composition II Honors   3
ENG136 Technical Writing   3
JRN150 Mediawriting and Reporting   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
          b.  Writing AND Communication (6 credits)
Choose one course from each list
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA105 Business English   3
CRW139 Intro to Creative Writing   3
ENG101 College Composition I   3
ENG102 College Composition II   3
ENG103 College Composition I Honors   3
ENG104 College Composition II Honors   3
ENG136 Technical Writing   3
JRN150 Mediawriting and Reporting   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
AND
 
Show / hide all applied communication/comm. courses

Applied Communication/Comm. Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/comm. component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA233 Business Communications   3
COM100 Intro Human Communication   3
COM131 Fund Speech Communication   3
COM134 Interpersonal Communication   3
COM135 Workplace Communication Skills   3
COM271 Small Group Communication   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all quantitative literacy courses

Quantitative Literacy Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the quantitative literacy component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
MAT100 Technical Mathematics   3
MAT122 Intermediate Algebra   3
MAT142 College Mathematics   3
MAT152 College Algebra   3
MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I   3
MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II   3
MAT167 Elementary Statistics   3
MAT172 Finite Mathematics   3
MAT183 Trigonometry   2
MAT187 Precalculus   5
MAT212 Survey of Calculus   3
MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I   5
MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II   5
MAT241 Calculus III   4
MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all critical thinking courses

Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & the Admin of Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Acad Reading Critical Thinking   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Society and Technology   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
      1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
AGS103 Plant Biology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 103. Plant Biology (4). An introduction to the growth, development, reproduction, and structure of vascular plants. Fundamental activities of plants including photosynthesis and respiration. Emphasis on agricultural and horticultural crops of Arizona. This course is cross-listed with BIO 103. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Classification of plants
2. Cell structures of plants
3. Cellular activity of plants
4. Chemical activity of plants
5. Mitosis and Meiosis
6. Plant tissues
7. Vegetative components
8. Plant growth improvement
9. Plant propagation
10. Plant growth environments
11. Economic and ecological importance
12. The scientific method

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (2-5, 7, 8, 10, 12) (PBS 3)
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (2-5, 7, 8, 10, 12)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (12) (PBS 1)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (9, 12)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (3, 4, 10, 12) (PBS 2)
6. Discuss the role of plants in the living world. (10)
7. Classify and name plants (1)
8. Compare monocots and dicots. (1, 7, 9)
9. Describe the plant cell structure. (2)
10. Describe cellular activity during meiosis. (3)
11. Explain the process and implications of mitosis and meiosis. (5)
12. Differentiate between various plant tissues. (6)
13. Identify the components of roots, stems, flowers, and leaves. (7)
14. Describe the origin and domestication of cultivated plants. (8)
15. Identify basic concepts in plant improvement. (8)
16. Distinguish between effective and ineffective plant propagation methods for specific plants. (9)
17. Summarize vegetative and reproductive growth and development principles. (7, 10, 12)
18. Identify the properties of photosynthesis, respiration, and translocation in vascular plants. (4)
19. Identify the physical and chemical properties of soil and soil water. (10)
20. Discuss the climactic factors affecting plant growth. (10)
21. Identify major economic crops in Arizona. (11)

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OR BIO103 Plant Biology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 103. Plant Biology (4). Introduction to the growth, development, reproduction, and structure of vascular plants. Fundamental activities of plants including photosynthesis and respiration. Emphasis on agricultural and horticultural crops of Arizona. This course is cross-listed with AGS 103. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Classification of plants
2. Cell structures of plants
3. Cellular activity of plants
4. Chemical activity of plants
5. Mitosis and Meiosis
6. Plant tissues
7. Vegetative components
8. Plant growth improvement
9. Plant propagation
10. Plant growth environments
11. Economic and ecological importance
12. The scientific method

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12) (PBS 3)
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12) (PBS 1)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (12) (PBS 2)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (9, 12) (PBS 2)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (3, 4, 10, 12) (PBS 2)
6. Discuss the role of plants in the living world. (10)
7. Classify and name plants (1)
8. Compare monocots and dicots. (1, 7, 9)
9. Describe the plant cell structure. (2)
10. Describe cellular activity during meiosis. (3)
11. Explain the process and implications of mitosis and meiosis. (5)
12. Differentiate between various plant tissues. (6)
13. Identify the components of roots, stems, flowers, and leaves. (7)
14. Describe the origin and domestication of cultivated plants. (8)
15. Identify basic concepts in plant improvement. (8) (PBS 2)
16. Distinguish between effective and ineffective plant propagation methods for specific plants. (9)
17. Summarize vegetative and reproductive growth and development principles. (7, 10, 12)
18. Identify the properties of photosynthesis, respiration, and translocation in vascular plants. (4)
19. Identify the physical and chemical properties of soil and soil water. (10)
20. Discuss the climactic factors affecting plant growth. (10)
21. Identify major economic crops in Arizona. (11)

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      2.  Behavioral OR Social Science (3 credits)
Choose one course from either list
 
Show / hide all behavioral science courses

Behavioral Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Growth and Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152 Personal Health & Wellness   3
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Growth and Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
OR
 
Show / hide all social science courses

Social Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Agriculture Technology Management Requirements
AGS101 Microcomputers in Agriculture

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 101. Microcomputers in Agriculture (3) (Fall). Use of Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for documentation, accounting and presentations in the agriculture industry. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contemporary computer use in the agriculture industry
2. Computer hardware
3. Using Microsoft Word in an agricultural setting
4. Using Excel in an agricultural setting
5. Using PowerPoint in an agricultural setting

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use and understand email.
2. Use and understand Windows 98.
3. Manage Files.
4. Use Internet Explorer.
5. Use the Internet.
6. Create a document.
7. Use and understand Microsoft Word.
8. Edit a document.
9. Format a document.
10. Create a report.
11. Use and understand Desktop Publishing.
12. Create outlines.
13. Create tables.
14. Create a table of contents.
15. Merge documents.
16. Create equations.
17. Use and understand Microsoft Excel.
18. Create worksheets.
19. Format worksheets.
20. Create charts.
21. Manage information.
22. Use and understand Microsoft Power Point.
23. Create a presentation.
24. Create and import graphics in slides.
25. Use and understand Microsoft Access.
26. Create a database.
27. Maintain a database.
28. Query a database.
29. Use and understand integration.
30. Integrate documents.
31. Use and understand web page design.
32. Create a web page.
33. Load web page onto Internet.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Compilation of portfolio in 1" notebook with cover sheet.

3
OR CSA126 Microsoft Office

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 126. Microsoft Office (3). Introductory concepts and techniques of Microsoft Office including Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Windows concepts and skills
2. Microsoft Word for Windows
3. Microsoft Excel for Windows
4. Microsoft Access for Windows
5. Microsoft PowerPoint for Windows
6. Integration of Microsoft Office applications

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use file management and other basic Windows skills. (1)
2. Produce and edit word processing documents. (2)
3. Produce and edit spreadsheets and charts. (3)
4. Create a database, enter and manipulate data, create queries and reports. (4)
5. Produce and edit presentation graphics documents. (5)
6. Produce a document that integrates the use of two or more Office applications. (6)

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.
AGS102 Agribusiness Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 102. Agribusiness Management (3). Introduction to the latest functions of agribusiness including history, starting and running a business, small business plans, input and output sectors, daily financial operations, and basic economic principles. Emphasizes principles of agricultural economics, and economic activity and analysis. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Agriculture and agribusiness
2. Size and importance of agribusiness
3. Emerging agribusiness technologies
4. Planning and organizing an agribusiness
5. Types of agribusiness
6. Personal financial management
7. Agribusiness record keeping and accounting
8. Input sector
9. Output sector
10. Agricultural economics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain agribusiness.
2. Discuss the size and importance of production agriculture.
3. Analyze the efficiency of production agriculture.
4. Explain the importance of agribusiness and foreign trade.
5. Describe the latest emerging technologies in agriculture.
6. Prepare a small business plan.
7. Compare proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.
8. Plan and prepare a personal budget.
9. Analyze a potential agribusiness venture.
10. Explain the differences between sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.
11. Describe the characteristics of franchises and cooperatives.
12. Complete a budget for a small agribusiness.
13. Complete a journal and ledger.
14. Complete a trial balance.
15. Explain basic accounting considerations.
16. Describe the single and double entry bookkeeping.
17. Prepare an income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flow.
18. Prepare a statement of owner equity.
19. Discuss the size and scope of the agribusiness input sector.
20. Discuss the private agribusiness sector.
21. Discuss the public agribusiness sector.
22. Identify the sources for credit.
23. Explain six types of economic systems.
24. Explain agricultural economics.

3
AGS105 Soils

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 105. Soils (3) (Fall). Comprehensive overview of the types of soils commonly found in North America with special emphasis on Southwestern soils. Course investigates the origin, formation, physical and chemical properties of soils and emphasizes soil testing, fertilization, and modifications to soils commonly found in landscapes, gardens and turf. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Components of soil
2. Soil and water relationships
3. Soil textural triangle
4. Modifications to soil for improvement
5. Drainage systems
6. Soil fertility
7. Soil pH
8. Soil testing
9. Cost factors
10. Southwestern soils

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the components of soil including sand, silt, and clay. (1)
2. Explain the relationship between soil and water. (2)
3. Using the soil textural triangle, determine the structure of soil and its effect on turfgrass. (3)
4. Identify components of a soil profile. (3)
5. Identify macro- and micro-nutrients needed for plant growth. (4)
6. Identify common soil amendments used to improve soil. (4)
7. Describe drainage systems used to remove excess water from soil. (5)
8. Describe the principles associated with soil fertility. (6)
9. Explain pH of soil and the methods used to modify pH. (7)
10. Using soil test kits, test soils for basic composition. (8)
11. Identify agencies to assist in soils testing. (8)
12. Calculate soil test results for nitrogen, phosphorus, iron and potassium. (8)
13. Describe soils common to the Southwest. (10)

3
AGS107 Entomology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 107. Entomology (3) (Spring). Fundamental approaches in the control of greenhouse pests. Categories of pests, management practices, herbicide use, alternative pest control techniques, safety, and integrated pest management. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Insects and related pests
2. Pest Identification and Classification
3. Economic Damage
4. Control Methodologies
5. Integrated Pest Management
6. Safety Practices

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Investigate the relationships between insects and people. (1)
2. Identify insects of economic importance. (3)
3. Describe the basic external morphology of insects and how it is used in classification. (1,2)
4. Describe the basic internal anatomy of insects. (1)
5. Describe the objectives and elements of insect classification. (2)
6. Classify insects by visual inspection. (1,2)
7. Identify unknown insects by use of standard taxonomic keys. (2)
8. Identify insects to Order by inspection, and identify common forms to Family. (1,2)
9. Describe the life cycles of important insect groups. (1)
10. Identify agents of biological control. (4,5)
11. Identify insecticide names and formulations. (1,2,5)
12. Explain the concepts involved in insect pest management. (5,6)
13. Discuss alternative pest control techniques. (4,5,6)
14. Formulate an integrated pest management plan to control insects. (5)

3
AGS120 Intro Animal Industry

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 120. Introduction to the Animal Industry (4). Classification of agricultural animals, the reproductive process, behavior, basic genetics, growth and development, basic nutrition, welfare and consumer concerns. Emphasis on beef, sheep, swine, poultry, horses and fish. Alternative animals including rabbits, llamas, ostrich, baitfish, and honeybees. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Animal agriculture as a science
2. Classification of animals
3. Beef industry
4. Dairy industry
5. Swine industry
6. Poultry industry
7. Sheep industry
8. Horse industry
9. Aquaculture industry
10. Small animal industry
11. Alternative animal industry
12. Behavior
13. Genetics
14. Selection
15. Reproduction
16. Growth and development
17. Nutrition
18. Meat science
19. Disease
20. Welfare
21. Consumer concerns

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Cite scientific discoveries that have made food better and less expensive for the consumer.
2. List the pharmaceuticals that are derived from animals.
3. List characteristics of animals that place them in different classifications.
4. Describe methods of classifying animals by means other than scientific classification.
5. Classify agricultural animals according to breed.
6. Explain the importance of beef in the human diet.
7. Describe the various segments of the beef industry.
8. Describe how cattle make use of feed stuff that cannot be consumed by humans.
9. Describe the process by which milk is produced.
10. Explain the process of pasteurization.
11. Describe the biological processes used to produce cheese.
12. Define hybrid vigor or heterosis.
13. Explain why pork is healthier to eat than it once was.
14. Describe the biological processes involved in the production of eggs in birds.
15. Describe modern layer operations.
16. Describe modern broiler operations.
17. Explain the characteristics of wool that make it good to humans.
18. Discuss the importance of mutton and lamb in the American diet.
19. List the various uses for horses in the United States.
20. Discuss the importance of the horse industry.
21. Discuss the different ways of classifying horses.
22. List the reasons why aquaculture is a rapidly growing industry.
23. Discuss the problems associated with fish production.
24. Describe the importance of the pet industry to the United States.
25. Explain the regulations governing the raising and importing of companion animals.
26. List the animals that are most often used in scientific research.
27. Discuss the orderly society of honeybees.
28. Explain how bees make honey.
29. Describe the types of social behavior in animals.
30. Describe the sexual and reproductive behavior in animals.
31. Explain how producers use the laws of genetics to predict genetic differences in animals.
32. Explain how performance data are used in the selection process.
33. Describe the phases of the female reproductive cycle.
34. Explain the processes by which fertilization takes place.
35. Describe estrus synchronization.
36. Define the lean-to-fat ratio.
37. Explain the steps in the slaughter of meat animals.
38. List the wholesale cuts of beef, pork and lamb.
39. Discuss the various methods of meat preservation.
40. Explain how livestock diseases are spread.
41. List examples of diseases in livestock caused by microorganisms.

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AGS157 Community Supported Agric

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 157. Community Supported Agriculture (3) (Fall). Production methods for scheduling crops for available space, seasonality, and customer need. Creation and implementation of plans for distribution and marketing sustainable, organic, and pesticide-free agriculture products. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Marketable crop identification
2. Facility benefits and limitations
3. Production scheduling
4. Harvest
5. Storage
6. Marketing
7. Pricing
8. Distribution
9. Packaging
10. Profit and loss
11. Growing methods

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Formulate a growing, producing, marketing and distribution plan based on the resources available. (1-7)
2. Determine crops that have potential for sale in the region. (1,3,4,6)
3. Choose the best production system for a chosen crop promoting organic, pesticide-free, and sustainable crops. (11)
4. Experiment with different products, price, packaging and seasonality to break norms of conventional agriculture. (1, 3, 5-7)
5. Recommend production techniques to improve quality and marketability of agricultural products. (4)
6. Set prices on items as determined by industry. (5)
7. Track and report production goals. (3)
8. Track labor, supplies and facility costs. (10)
9. Develop a profit and loss statement for the season. (7, 10)
10. Amend production plans to meet the changing need of customer base. (3,4)
11. Classify crops by warm season or cool season. (1)
12. Utilize and develop unique packaging materials for ready-for-market products. (7)
13. Critique, customize and recommend growing methods for the production classes. (9)
14. Harvest crops at optimum times to ensure freshness and flavor. (4)
15. Store products to extend the distribution potential without reducing quality. (5)
16. Analyze and reflect on the seasonís production and make recommendations for the next. (2-11)

3
AGS215 Agricultural Mechanics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 215. Agricultural Mechanics (3) (Spring). Principles and operative skills in agriscience technology, including troubleshooting, maintenance, and repair of common agriculture tools and equipment. Emphasis on mig welding, electricity, concrete and mortar, pumps, engines and motors, and basic construction practicing OSHA safety standards. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Mig welding and cutting torch operation
2. Tools and power tools
3. Construction fencing, concrete, forms, and mortar
4. Electrical wiring and fuses
5. Pump operation, troubleshooting, maintenance and repair
6. Small engine and equipment operation, troubleshooting, maintenance and repair
7. Safety standards

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Produce durable mig welds when given specifications and raw materials. (1)
2. Utilize a cutting torch for project completion. (1)
3. Choose the best hand and/or power tool for the required task and support the decision. (2)
4. Operate hand tools and power tools safely and with proper care. (2,7)
5. Measure, lay out and create wooden forms for concrete construction applications. (3)
6. Identify concrete components and determine slump for various concrete applications. (3)
7. Plan, estimate and lay block and brick. (3)
8. Design, estimate, calculate materials and construct fencing projects. (3)
9. Wire sprinklers, timers and valves utilizing the proper gauged wire. (4)
10. Complete basic wiring of a light and test for functionality. (4)
11. Identify and replace fuses as needed in agricultural settings. (4)
12. Troubleshoot, disassemble, reassemble and repair pumps in agricultural settings. (5)
13. Diagnose and perform routine maintenance on agricultural equipment, including oil, filters, fuel, batteries and belts. (6)
14. Safely operate agriculture equipment, such as tractors, ATV's, mowers, tillers and sprayers. (6,7)

3
AGS274 Water Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 274. Water Management (3) (Spring). Irrigation techniques for golf courses, greenhouses, aquaculture, and horse production including sizing pipes and fittings, backflow prevention, filtration, pumps, sprinklers, spraybooms, misters, and valves. Includes code requirements, blueprint reading, and bidding. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Pipe types and sizes
2. Fittings
3. Valves
4. Pumps
5. Drain tiles
6. Filters
7. Backflow prevention
8. Blueprint reading
9. Irrigation design
10. Code requirements
11. Recirculation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify types and sizes of pipe used in irrigation systems.
2. Select the most appropriate pipe for a given circuit.
3. Demonstrate the use of tools commonly used in plumbing.
4. Identify the valve boxes used for manifold systems.
5. Identify the most commonly used fittings for connecting pipe.
6. Select the appropriate fitting for a given connection.
7. Explain the different uses for gate, globe and ball valves.
8. List the advantages and disadvantages of the three most common valves.
9. Determine correct positioning for drain tiles.
10. Select the most appropriate backflow prevention device for a given circuit.
11. Distinguish between in-line manual and automatic valves.
12. Distinguish between manual and automatic pressure vacuum breakers.
13. Determine appropriate sprinkler spacing.
14. Explain the difference between static and working pressure.
15. Determine local codes for commercial irrigation.
16. Solve for pressure drop over a given run.
17. Design greenhouse irrigation and fertilization system.
18. Design aquaculture systems.
19. Design horse watering systems.
20. Design golf course systems.
21. Troubleshoot sprayboom nozzles.
22. Determine circuits, valves, draintiles, and sprinklers for a given par three hole.
23. Calculate costs for irrigation of a par three hole.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Irrigation design for par three hole or greenhouse.

3
Select and complete 16 credits from the following courses:
AGS250 Horticulture Science I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 250. Horticulture Science I (4) (Fall). Greenhouse production activities including cuttings, seedlings, sowing, tagging, fertilizers, sanitation, nutrition, and elements of container grown crops. Emphasis on production of tomatoes, lettuce, flowers, foliage plants, and bedding plants. Operation of industry standard computer control systems for greenhouses. Emphasis on the ARGUS system for environmental control, watering, fertilization, and shipping. Two lecture. Six lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Fertilizers
2. Water
3. Sexual propagation
4. Asexual propagation
5. Container grown crops
6. Sanitation practices
7. Computer applications
8. The Micro-Grow system
9. Programming for vents, shade, humidity, light, cooling, heating, fertilizers, watering, shipping
10. Suppliers

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Operate a potting machine. (5)
2. Tag plants. (5)
3. Apply computer applications to operated and program a sowing machine. (5,7)
4. Apply computer applications to operate and program a spray boom or chemicals and for application. (6,7)
5. Adjust a spray boom or speed and volume. (6)
6. Adjust a computer for environmental control of a specific crop. (7,8)
7. Observe crop for physiological changes. (1,2,6)
8. Mix and apply fertilizers. (9)
9. Test soil for pH. (9)
10. Test water for alkalinity. (2,9)
11. Operate and program a transplanter. (4)
12. Propagate poinsettia plants asexually. (4)
13. Identify containers used for plants. (5)
14. Identify machinery used in greenhouses. (3,4,7,8)
15. Practice appropriate sanitation techniques. (6)
16. Identify the correct environments for plant propagation both sexually and asexually. (4)
17. Adjust light, temperature, and moisture requirements for plants. (9)
18. Identify biocontrol suppliers. (10)
19. Prepare a hydrating solution. (2)
20. Identify venting, shade, cooling, hardening and humidity requirements for plants and program the computer with those requirements. (9)
21. Identify light, cooling and hardening, heating needs, fertilizer needs, and watering need requirements for plants and program the computer with those requirements. (9)
22. Program for shipping. (9)

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AGS252 Horticulture Science II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 252. Horticulture Science II (4) (Spring). Activities conducted in commercial greenhouses including propagation, sowing, distribution, light and temperature management, hardening off, preharvest and post harvest handling, inventory, deliveries, and sanitation. Emphasis on final stages of production and care of production. Computerized scheduling of greenhouse operations. Two lecture. Six lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Advanced propagation
2. Inventories
3. Shipping scheduling
4. Supply ordering
5. Transplanting, potting, and repotting, clay pots, plastic pots
6. Market preparation
7. Cultural disorders
8. Insect scouting
9. Micropropagation
10. Fertilization
11. Computerized environmental control (Micro-Grow system)
12. Production scheduling
13. 98% capacity scheduling
14. Germination chamber scheduling
15. Indoor/outdoor scheduling
16. Restocking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of clay pots and plastic pots. (5)
2. Select appropriate methods for potting plants. (1,5)
3. Recommend fertilization for mature plants. (10)
4. Control growth, disease and insects. (7-9)
5. Identify factors affecting stretch. (7,10,11)
6. Identify common foliage and bedding plants by scientific and common name. (1)
7. Explain cultural methods for high quality tomatoes, bedding plants, and lettuce. (7-11,14,15)
8. Identify mass-market outlets. (2,6,15,16)
9. Prepare plants for market. (4,6,9,12,13)
10. Package tomatoes by size. (6)
11. Package lettuce for shipping. (3,6)
12. Price tomatoes by lug or flat. (6)
13. Coordinate truck routes for efficiency. (6)
14. Predict space availability in a greenhouse for short and long term production. (1,12)
15. Ensure a 98% greenhouse fill rate. (13)
16. Identify a greenhouse's carrying capacity. (13)
17. Calculate square footage of a greenhouse. (12,13)
18. Maintain control of inventory. (2,16)
19. Establish shipping and germination times. (2,14)
20. Restock inventories in accordance with market demand. (16)
21. Determine ongoing space availability for hardening off and for outside operations. (13)
22. Utilize the Micro-Grow system. (11)

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AGS261 Aquaculture Science

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 261. Aquaculture Science (4). Introduction to the aquaculture and fisheries industry and the related career opportunities. Basic fish culturing environments and species identification of fresh and saltwater fish. Fish biology, diseases, prevention and treatments. Includes fish feeds and feeding techniques. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Careers in the aquaculture and fisheries industry
2. Species identification
3. Land requirements
4. Water requirement and management
5. Parasitic, bacterial diseases, and potential viruses in fish
6. Disease identification, treatment, prevention and control.
7. Feeds and feeding techniques
8. Morphology and biology of fish

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the common species in the aquaculture and fisheries industry in Arizona. (2)
2. Calculate stocking densities. (3,4)
3. Test water and apply corrective measures as needed. (4)
4. Visually identify the diseases most common to economically important fish through behavioral means, microscope imaging, and physical signs. (6)
5. Potential parasitic, bacterial and viral diseases in fish. (5)
6. Apply corrective measures for control or eradication of disease. (5,6)
7. Identify and apply approved treatments using chemicals on diseased fish. (6)
8. Identify and describe the external and internal anatomy of fish including neurons, circulatory, and digestive systems. (8)
9. Select appropriate feeds for a given species of fish. (7)
10. Identify basic components of common aquaculture systems. (3,4)
11. Identify the careers in the aquaculture fisheries industry. (1)

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AGS264 Aquaculture Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 264. Aquaculture Management (4) (Spring). Methodologies used in managing aquaculture systems. Including breeding and rearing procedures of common fin fish, saltwater fish and crustaceans. Field experience in maintaining a rearing facility and producing a food fish from incubation to stocker or market size. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Fish containers
2. Aeration systems
3. Filtration media
4. Aquaculture systems
5. Solid waste removal
6. Environmental conditions
7. Reproduction
8. Data collection
9. Business principles
10. Feeding

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Design a recirculating and flow through aquaculture system. (1-4)
2. Identify appropriate feed and develop a feeding schedule. (10)
3. Breed fish from brood stock. (7)
4. Hatch eggs and grow out through harvesting. (7)
5. Manage water systems and environmental controls for recirculating aquaculture systems. (4-6)
6. Perform maintenance on recirculating aquaculture systems. (4)
7. Collect data and keep hatchery records. (8)
8. Determine costs and revenue for recirculating aquaculture systems. (9)

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AGS280 Zoo and Domestic Animal Care

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 280. Zoo and Domestic Animal Care (4) (Spring). Introduction to zoo and domestic animal care. Includes safety issues, zoo orientation, animal observation skills, sanitation, housing, feeding, capture and restraint equipment, animal transport, animal measurements, abnormal behavior and injuries. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Safety and emergency preparedness
2. Equipment lab/animal permits
3. Weights and measures
4. Zoo orientation
5. Wildlife husbandry
6. Wildlife and domestic facilities maintenance
7. Animal identification
8. Zookeeping essentials
9. Animal observation for health and behavior

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify proper clothing and gear worn when working with various animals.
2. Establish safety procedures for handling and approach of animals.
3. Identify by name, genus, and species, the most common domestic and zoo animals.
4. Describe keeper routines for various domestic and wild animals.
5. Determine the risks associated with enclosure cleaning and maintenance.
6. Maintain a record log of animal behavior as it relates to keeper safety.
7. Predict possible animal behavior from observations.
8. Establish an objective view of humane considerations including feelings, infliction of pain, psychological upsets, and speed of return to normalcy.
9. Determine when restraint is necessary.
10. Use of proper restraint tools and chemicals to subdue animals.
11. Predict thermoregulation stress when handling animals.
12. Weigh and measure wild and domestic animals.
13. Calculate feeds for domestic and wild animals.
14. Identify basic cleaning equipment.
15. Establish use of two-way radio codes at zoos.
16. Determine legal requirements from state, federal and local agencies for care and housing of wild and domestic animals as a business or sanctuary enterprise.

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AGS282 Zoo & Domestic Animal Behavior

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 282. Zoo and Domestic Animal Behavior (4) (Fall). Assessment of animal behavior in a variety of species including domestic and exotic animals. Includes internal and external factors influencing animal behavior, social organization, genetics, communication, conflict, mating systems, and biological rhythms. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Behavioral genetics
2. Evolution and behavior patterns
3. Nervous system
4. Hormones and immunology behavior
5. Biological rhythms
6. Communication
7. Migration
8. Habitat selection
9. Conflict
10. Sexual reproduction

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze the history of behavioral genetics and evolution. (1)
2. List the design features in animal behavior studies. (1,2)
3. Determine the basic principles of genetics in animals. (1,5)
4. Distinguish between macroevolutionary and microevolutionary changes in behavior. (2,7)
5. Identify the parts of the nervous system and their associated functions. (3,4)
6. List the biological rhythms and their significance in animal behavior. (5,6)
7. Determine how communication conveys information between animal and human interaction. (6)
8. Analyze and identify migration patterns and navigational mechanisms for a given set of animals. (7,8)
9. Recognize the signs leading to animal conflict. (9)
10. Calculate the costs and benefits of sexual reproduction and selection in the animal kingdom. (10)

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