Associate of Applied Science - Applied Pre-Engineering Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Instructional Specialist Stephanie Wiltcher (928) 717-7107
Dean John Morgan (928) 717-7721

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Applied Pre-Engineering

The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Applied Pre-Engineering is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of engineering concepts.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Applied Pre-Engineering Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Articulate basic mathematical, scientific and applicable engineering principles. (EGR 102, MAT 220, MAT 230, PHY 150, PHY 151)
  2. Model and solve problems using electronics, robotics and precision manufacturing principles. (CNC 101, CNC 102, CNC 201, CNC 202, ELT 130, ELT 183)
  3. Utilize modern manufacturing techniques, skills and tools necessary to design, develop, implement, and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment and energy. (CNC 101, CNC 102, CNC 201, CNC 202, EGR 102, ELT 130, ELT 183)
  4. Write effective documents that are audience specific and describe technical operations or scientific principles. (EGR 102, ENG 101, ENG 102)
  5. Work effectively as members or leaders of a team to accomplish an objective. (EGR 102, ELT 130)
 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I. General Education
   A.  Foundation Studies (14 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

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OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

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ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

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OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

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       2.  Numeracy (5 credits)
MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

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       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all critical thinking courses

Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (8 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (5 credits)
CHM151 General Chemistry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 151. General Chemistry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1151. Exploration of chemical measurement, classification, stoichiometry, and structure/function relationships for inorganic, organic and biological materials. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students. Prerequisite: MAT 122 or higher or two years of high school algebra. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific method and measurement
a. Observation, description, and experiment
b. The metric system
c. Problem solving using dimensional analysis
2. Structure, properties, and classification of matter
a. Atomic structure and electron configurations
b. Elements, molecules, ions, and compounds,
c. Chemical formulas, equations, nomenclature
3. Physical behavior of matter
a. Gases, liquids and solids
b. Solutions and electrolytes
c. Concentration, and dilution
4. Stoichiometry and reactions
a. The mole concept
b. Writing and balancing chemical equations
c. Limiting reagent and reaction yield
5. Chemical reactions and behavior
a. Acids and bases, oxidation and reduction
6. Chemical bonding
a. Ionic vs. Covalent compounds
b. Lewis Structures
c. VSEPR and Valance Bond Theory
d. Molecular structure and properties
7. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry
a. Hydrocarbons, structural formulas, functional groups
8. Laboratory practice
a. Conventional and Instrumental analysis, experimental design, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.

LEARNING OUTCOMES::
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems using the concepts central to chemistry.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon.
b. Write equations that describe chemical change using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (8) (PBS 2)
a. Use standard glassware and instruments to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (8) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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       2.  Behavioral OR Social Science (3 credits)
Choose one course from either list
 
Show / hide all behavioral science courses

Behavioral Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152   
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
OR
 
Show / hide all social science courses

Social Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Applied Pre-Engineering Requirements
CNC101 CNC Machine Operator

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CNC 101. CNC Machine Operator (2). Basic principles and operative skills in the operation of CNC milling machine and lathes. One lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Shop safety
2. Measuring instruments and Micrometer reading
3. CNC Machine Operation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply machine shop safety principles. (1)
2. Use micro-measurement instruments. (2)
3. Read a micrometer (2)
4. Turn on, home the machine and determine the active program. (3)
5. Load CNC programs into the controller using at least 3 of the 4 accepted methods. (3)
6. Load the proper program into the“EDITOR" and confirm that listed tools in the program are those which correspond to the tools in the machine. (3)
7. Run a part program to completion. (3)
8. Check oil levels, coolant levels, and coolant concentration. (3)
9. Set tooling and record the appropriate tooling data into the controller. (3)
10. Set the work coordinate for a given part and input data into the work offset page of the controller (3)
11. Discern the difference between a graphical representation of a good tool path vs. a near net shape. (3)
12. Move, copy, delete, insert and find & replace data in a program. (3)
13. Operate the CNC milling machine in a manual mode and set the machine to specific operational settings. (3)
14. Restart the program at any tool change or at any point in the program. (3)
15. Touch off all the tools and record their offset data on the tool offset page. (3)
16. Measure the stock to determine the amount of excess length. (3)
17. Load work into the Chuck. (3)
18. Select a facing/turning tool to face the work piece off. (3)
19. Set CNC for appropriate RPM's. (3)
20. Face the part off using the hand wheel. (3)
21. Find all the feed rates concerning linear motion for a finish pass from .003 to .005. (3)

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CNC102 CNC Machine Set Up

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CNC 102. CNC Machine Setup (4) (Fall). Basic principles and operative skills to setup and operate through 1st. article part CNC mills and lathes. Prerequisite: CNC 101. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. CNC Mill and lathe operation.
2. Speeds and feeds.
3. Blueprint reading.
4. Troubleshooting tooling problems.
5. Dimensioning.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify coordinate and primary machine axes. (1)
2. Define and describe absolute and incremental positioning. (1)
3. Show procedures in starting the CNC milling machine and for running a program in graphics mode.(1)
4. Identify the machine coordinate systems and how to use them. (1)
5. Identify CNC tooling and applications. (1,4)
6. Identify cutting tool collets and holding fixtures. (1,4)
7. Identify the proper use of fixtures, setups and gagging. (1)
8. Set work offsets. (1,4)
9. Load tools and set tool length offsets. (1,5)
10. Use proper cutter compensation and calculate cutting tool speeds and feeds. (1,4)
11. Read blue prints and interrupt job operation sheets. (3)
12. Identify geometric tolerance and how they are used. (5)
13. Define program format and definitions within. (1,2)
14. Identify and define machine default“G" codes and micellaneous "M" codes. (1,2,4)
15. Describe the program structure. (4,5)
16. Read, interrupt and edit machine programs. (1,2,4,5)
17. Identify alphabetical address codes. (1)
18. Determine solutions for twist drill and endmill problems. (4)
19. Determine how to maintain part reliability and dimensional specifications for multiple parts. (5)
20. Adjust for tool nose compensation and determine solutions for tooling problems. (4)

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CNC201 Comp Aided Program CNC Mach

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CNC 201. Computer Aided Programming for CNC Machining (3) (Spring). Two-dimensional designing of machinery parts using Feature Cam software. Includes design and illustration of the part, tooling sequencing, starting a lathe using Feature Cam, part cutting simulation, and Numerical Control Code. Prerequisite: CNC 101 (may be taken concurrently). Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Tooling for Machining Centers.
2. Using FeatureCam.
3. Introduction to 2.5D milling.
4. Introduction to Turning.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe tooling used in a CNC Mill Machine. (1)
2. Produce a CADD drawing for CNC machines using Feature Cam. (2)
3. Produce a 2.5 D milling part. (3)
4. Manage a CNC lathe and Mill after Feature Cam programming for production of parts.(4)

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CNC202 3-D Program & Rapid Prototype

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CNC 202. 3-D Programming and Rapid Protyping for CNC (4). Basic principles of 3-D programming and rapid prototyping for modern manufacturing applications. Prerequisite: CNC 201.Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Features and 3-D CAD models
2. 3-D milling
3. 3-D scanner and rapid prototyping

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create a 3-D CAD model and manipulate its alignment. (1)
2. Setup automatic feature recognition. (1)
3. Setup hole and pocket recognition features. (1)
4. Create a slot feature. (1)
5. Create a 3-D surface feature. (2)
6. Create a surface milling feature. (2)
7. Import a 3-D Part. (2)
8. Select tool path and tool type strategies. (2)
9. Discuss 3-D scanning strategies. (3)
10. Review 3-D printing in plastic. (3)
11. Review 3-D machining from 3-D scans. (3)

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ELT130 Introduction to Robotics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ELT 130. Introduction to Robotics (3). Fundamental concepts of robotics including how robots move, sense, and perceive the world around them. Hands-on operation and programming of robots. Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Robotic terms and definitions
2. Robotic design
3. Robot programming
4. Work cell design

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the interdisciplinary field and concepts comprising robotics, including sensing and movement. (1)
2. Identify and describe the parts of a robot including number of axes. (1,2)
3. Utilize a computer language to program a robot. (3)
4. Describe widely used robotic programming structures in a variety of settings such as assignment, looping, conditional statements, and the use of variables. (3)
5. Create a robotic based work cell capable of performing a simple repetitive task. (4)
6. Identify and evaluate patterns of logic and reasoning, including faulty patterns. (4)

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ELT183 Digital Circuits

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ELT 183. Digital Circuits (3) (Fall). Introduction to logic circuits used in computers and other digital equipment. Includes number systems, logic gates, combinatorial logic, simplification techniques, encoders, decoders, flip-flops, counters, registers, memory, and digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters. Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Number systems, operations and codes
2. Logic gates and combinatorial logic
3. Boolean algebra and logic simplification techniques
4. Flip-flops and related devices
5. Counters and registers
6. Memory and storage
7. Digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify, and convert numbers between, the various digital number systems including binary, octal and hexadecimal. (1)
2. Identify and convert digital codes such as ASCII, gray code, and floating point numbers. (1)
3. Identify and describe the operation of basic logic gates and combine them to form combinatorial logic circuits. (2)
4. Analyze and troubleshoot logic gates and combinatorial logic circuits. (2)
5. Simplify complex logic circuits using Booelan algebra and other techniques such as sum-of-products and Karnaugh mapping. (3)
6. Identify, describe the operation of, analyze and troubleshoot various flip-flop circuits. (4)
7. Identify, describe the operation of, analyze and troubleshoot digital counters and registers. (5)
8. Identify, describe, analyze and troubleshoot digital memory and storage techniques including data selectors, encoders and decoders. (6)
9. Identify, describe, analyze and troubleshoot digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters. (7)

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EGR102 Introduction to Engineering

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
EGR 102. Introduction to Engineering (3). Introduction to the field of engineering. Emphasizes the integration of teamwork, problem solving, and verbal communication skills into a design project. Prerequisite: MAT 187. Reading Proficiency. Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Engineering as a career and profession
2. Ethics
3. Analysis and problem solving
4. Design processes
5. Project management and teamwork skills

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the engineering profession. (1)
2. Describe engineering ethics, including professional practice and licensure. (1,2)
3. Use technical communication skills when presenting the results of group projects. (3)
4. Explain engineering analysis and design processes. (3-4)
5. Analyze data collected during laboratory procedures from a variety of engineering disciplines. (3,5)
6. Design a simple engineering device, write a design report, and present the design. (4,5)

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III.  Related Requirements
MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

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MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

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PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 150. Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (5) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1121. Principles of mechanics. Kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, equilibrium, fluids, gravitation, and oscillations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 220. One year of high school physics or PHY 111/112 is strongly recommended. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Kinematics and dynamics of individual particles and systems of particles.
2. Newton's laws of motion
3. Linear and rotational motion
4. Kinetic and potential energy
5. Work
6. Collisions
7. Gravitation
8. Equilibrium and statics
9. Fluid statics and dynamics
10. Oscillations
11. Conservation laws: linear momentum, angular momentum, energy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the kinematics and dynamics of constant velocity motion, constant acceleration motion, projectile motion, uniform circular motion, collisions and explosions, rotational motion, equilibrium, orbital motion, and simple harmonic motion. (1-8, 10,11) (PBS 1-3)
2. Analyze the behavior of ideal fluids. (9) (PBS 2)
3. Apply Newton's laws to physical problems. (2,3,7,10) (PBS 2,3)
4. Apply conservation laws to physical problems. (11) (PBS 2)
5. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
6. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-11) (PBS 1)
7. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
8. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
9. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-11) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

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PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 151. Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1131. Waves and sound, electromagnetism, circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell's equations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 230 and PHY 150. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Waves, sound
2. Electric charge and current
3. Electric and magnetic fields in vacuum and in materials
4. Induction
5. DC and AC circuits
6. Displacement current
7. Maxwell's equations
8. Electromagnetic waves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe and analyze basic wave phenomena, including applications to music. (1) (PBS 2)
2. Apply electric and magnetic forces and fields to basic statics and dynamics problems. (2,3) (PBSO 2)
3. Analyze the behaviors of, and relationships between, charged particles, electric fields, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic waves. (3,4,6-8) (PBS 2)
4. Design, construct, and analyze simple electrical circuits. (5) (PBS 2,3)
5. State Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism, and discuss the physical meaning of each. (7) (PBS 2)
6. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
7. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1)
8. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
9. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
10. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

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