Associate of Applied Science - Viticulture and Enology Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Dean James Perey (928) 634-6513
Enology Director Michael Pierce (928) 634-6586
Viticulture Director Nikki Check (928) 634-6576
Instructional Specialist Teresa Schwickerath (928) 634-6575
Dean John Morgan (928) 717-7721

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Viticulture and Enology

The Viticulture and Enology degree program prepares students for a variety of careers in vineyards (vineyard workers, crew leaders, managers, viticulturists) to wineries (winemakers, cellar workers, lab technicians).

Note: Students must be 21 years of age or older to pursue the Viticulture and Enology Degree.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Viticulture and Enology Degree program, the learner will be able to:

  1. Evaluate, design and develop a site for vinefera production. (VEN 100, VEN 101)
  2. Schedule and perform necessary seasonal vineyard operations for production of wine grapes. (VEN 102, VEN 195V)
  3. Analyze and Maintain crop health. (AGS 105, AGS 107, AGS 274, VEN 100, VEN 102, VEN 195V)
  4. Grow wine grapes. (VEN 100, VEN 101, VEN 102, VEN 195V)
  5. Select, analyze and process grapes for winemaking. (VEN 195E, VEN 200)
  6. Perform steps in the winemaking process. (VEN 195E, VEN 200, VEN 201, VEN 202)
  7. Apply chemistry and microbiology concepts needed for winemaking. (VEN 195E, VEN 200, VEN 201, VEN 202)
  8. Perform and analyze fermentations. (VEN 195E, VEN 200, VEN 201, VEN 202)
  9. Produce wines. (VEN 195E, VEN 200, VEN 201, VEN 202)
  10. Analyze wines. (VEN 120, VEN 121, VEN 195E, VEN 200, VEN 201, VEN 202)
  11. Evaluate wines. (VEN 120, VEN 121, VEN 195E, VEN 200, VEN 201, VEN 202)
 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Requirements
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition or Applied Communication - Select Option a or b:
          a.  Writing (6 credits)
Choose two courses from approved list
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA105 Business English   3
CRW139 Intro to Creative Writing   3
ENG101 College Composition I   3
ENG102   
ENG103 College Composition I Honors   3
ENG104 College Composition II Honors   3
ENG136 Technical Writing   3
JRN150 Mediawriting and Reporting   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
         b.  Writing AND Communication (6 credits)
Choose one course from each list
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA105 Business English   3
CRW139 Intro to Creative Writing   3
ENG101 College Composition I   3
ENG102   
ENG103 College Composition I Honors   3
ENG104 College Composition II Honors   3
ENG136 Technical Writing   3
JRN150 Mediawriting and Reporting   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
AND
 
Show / hide all applied communication/comm. courses

Applied Communication/Comm. Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/comm. component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA233 Business Communications   3
COM100 Intro Human Communication   3
COM131 Fund Speech Communication   3
COM134   
COM135 Workplace Communication Skills   3
COM271   
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all quantitative literacy courses

Quantitative Literacy Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the quantitative literacy component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
MAT100 Technical Mathematics   3
MAT122 Intermediate Algebra   3
MAT142 College Mathematics   3
MAT152 College Algebra   3
MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I   3
MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II   3
MAT167   
MAT172 Finite Mathematics   3
MAT183 Trigonometry   2
MAT187 Precalculus   5
MAT212 Survey of Calculus   3
MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I   5
MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II   5
MAT241 Calculus III   4
MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all critical thinking courses

Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 130. Fundamental Chemistry (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1130. Introduction to the study of chemistry as a basis for understanding our complicated world. Overview of classification, structure, and chemical behavior, including inorganic, organic, and biological materials. Prerequisite: MAT 092 or one year of high school algebra or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The Scientific Method
2. Measurement and units of measurement.
a. The metric system, dimensional analysis
3. The structure, properties, and classification of matter
a. Atoms, isotopes, ions, elements and compounds
b. Electronic structure, and periodic properties
c. Formulas, equations, names
4. Nuclear Radiation
a. Radioactivity and Radioisotopes
5. Compounds and Bonding
a. Ions and molecules
b. Ionic and covalent bonds
c. Geometry of molecules
6. Chemical Reactions
a. Writing and balancing chemical equations
b. Equations and the mole
c. Problem solving using dimensional analysis
7. Gases Liquids and Solids
a. Kinetic Molecular Theory
b. Intermolecular forces
c. Changes of state
8. Solutions
a. Concentration
b. Colligative properties
9. Chemical reactions and behavior
a. Acid -base equilibrium, pH, and buffers
10. Introductory aspects of elementary organic, and biological chemistry
a. Functional groups, isomers polymers, carbohydrates, lipids proteins, and enzymes
b. Reactions and synthesis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems using concepts central to chemistry
b. Relate molecular shape and polarity to physical properties
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use scientific vocabulary to describe chemical phenomenon.
b. Write equations that describe chemical change using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-10) ((PBS 2)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Use graphical data to analyze unknowns.
c. Draw conclusions regarding a chemical relationship using information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1,2,4,8,9) (PBS 2)
a. Use standard glassware and instruments to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Complete a report sheet that documents the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

4
       2.  Behavioral OR Social Science (3 credits)
Choose one course from either list
 
Show / hide all behavioral science courses

Behavioral Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152   
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
OR
 
Show / hide all social science courses

Social Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Viticulture and Enology Requirements
AGS105 Soils

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 105. Soils (3) (Fall). Comprehensive overview of the types of soils commonly found in North America with special emphasis on Southwestern soils. Course investigates the origin, formation, physical and chemical properties of soils and emphasizes soil testing, fertilization, and modifications to soils commonly found in landscapes, gardens and turf. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Components of soil
2. Soil and water relationships
3. Soil textural triangle
4. Modifications to soil for improvement
5. Drainage systems
6. Soil fertility
7. Soil pH
8. Soil testing
9. Cost factors
10. Southwestern soils

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the components of soil including sand, silt, and clay. (1)
2. Explain the relationship between soil and water. (2)
3. Using the soil textural triangle, determine the structure of soil and its effect on turfgrass. (3)
4. Identify components of a soil profile. (3)
5. Identify macro- and micro-nutrients needed for plant growth. (4)
6. Identify common soil amendments used to improve soil. (4)
7. Describe drainage systems used to remove excess water from soil. (5)
8. Describe the principles associated with soil fertility. (6)
9. Explain pH of soil and the methods used to modify pH. (7)
10. Using soil test kits, test soils for basic composition. (8)
11. Identify agencies to assist in soils testing. (8)
12. Calculate soil test results for nitrogen, phosphorus, iron and potassium. (8)
13. Describe soils common to the Southwest. (10)

3
AGS107 Entomology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 107. Entomology (3) (Spring). Fundamental approaches in the control of greenhouse pests. Categories of pests, management practices, herbicide use, alternative pest control techniques, safety, and integrated pest management. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Insects and related pests
2. Pest Identification and Classification
3. Economic Damage
4. Control Methodologies
5. Integrated Pest Management
6. Safety Practices

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Investigate the relationships between insects and people. (1)
2. Identify insects of economic importance. (3)
3. Describe the basic external morphology of insects and how it is used in classification. (1,2)
4. Describe the basic internal anatomy of insects. (1)
5. Describe the objectives and elements of insect classification. (2)
6. Classify insects by visual inspection. (1,2)
7. Identify unknown insects by use of standard taxonomic keys. (2)
8. Identify insects to Order by inspection, and identify common forms to Family. (1,2)
9. Describe the life cycles of important insect groups. (1)
10. Identify agents of biological control. (4,5)
11. Identify insecticide names and formulations. (1,2,5)
12. Explain the concepts involved in insect pest management. (5,6)
13. Discuss alternative pest control techniques. (4,5,6)
14. Formulate an integrated pest management plan to control insects. (5)

3
AGS274 Water Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 274. Water Management (3) (Spring). Irrigation techniques for golf courses, greenhouses, aquaculture, and horse production including sizing pipes and fittings, backflow prevention, filtration, pumps, sprinklers, spraybooms, misters, and valves. Includes code requirements, blueprint reading, and bidding. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Pipe types and sizes
2. Fittings
3. Valves
4. Pumps
5. Drain tiles
6. Filters
7. Backflow prevention
8. Blueprint reading
9. Irrigation design
10. Code requirements
11. Recirculation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify types and sizes of pipe used in irrigation systems.
2. Select the most appropriate pipe for a given circuit.
3. Demonstrate the use of tools commonly used in plumbing.
4. Identify the valve boxes used for manifold systems.
5. Identify the most commonly used fittings for connecting pipe.
6. Select the appropriate fitting for a given connection.
7. Explain the different uses for gate, globe and ball valves.
8. List the advantages and disadvantages of the three most common valves.
9. Determine correct positioning for drain tiles.
10. Select the most appropriate backflow prevention device for a given circuit.
11. Distinguish between in-line manual and automatic valves.
12. Distinguish between manual and automatic pressure vacuum breakers.
13. Determine appropriate sprinkler spacing.
14. Explain the difference between static and working pressure.
15. Determine local codes for commercial irrigation.
16. Solve for pressure drop over a given run.
17. Design greenhouse irrigation and fertilization system.
18. Design aquaculture systems.
19. Design horse watering systems.
20. Design golf course systems.
21. Troubleshoot sprayboom nozzles.
22. Determine circuits, valves, draintiles, and sprinklers for a given par three hole.
23. Calculate costs for irrigation of a par three hole.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Irrigation design for par three hole or greenhouse.

3
VEN100 Introduction to Viticulture

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 100. Introduction to Viticulture (3). World history of grapes and their production. Emphasis on the varieties of grapes, grapevine biology and physiology, vineyard management, and harvest and post-harvest operations. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of grapes
2. Arizona, United States and global grape production
3. Species and varieties of grapes
4. Grapevine biology, physiology, growth and development
5. Grape plant structures and functions
6. Vineyard management and cultural practices
7. Soil and climate
8. Wine making

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the history of grape cultivation and distribution. (1)
2.Compare grape species and cultivars used in the United States and throughout the world. (2,3)
3. Describe the evolution and taxonomy of cultivated species and the development of cultivars, varieties and rootstocks. (1-3)
4. Discuss grape production in Arizona: history, geography, raisin, table and wine grape regions, and cultivators. (2,3)
5. Explain grape physiology including photosynthesis, transpiration and environmental control of growth and development. (4,5)
6. Describe grape dormancy and bud break, phonology, vegetative and reproductive growth, berry growth and composition. (4,5)
7. Identify pruning systems and techniques. (4,6)
8. Discuss grapevine propagation methods, techniques and applications. (4-6)
9. Identify pests and discuss their control and management. (6)
10. Explain vineyard site selection and orientation, and describe soil preparation, planting, training, and trellis systems. (6,7)
11. Identify grapevine water and soil and nutrient requirements. (6,7)
12. Explain harvest and post-harvest operations including maturity factors, raisin types and processing, and table and wine grape harvesting, processing, and storage. (8)
13. Describe the process of wine making. (8)

3
VEN101 Establishing Vinifera Vineyard

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 101. Establishing a Vinifera Vineyard (3). Introduction to the processes of establishing a vineyard. Emphasis on site selection, vine varieties, soil preparation, planting methods, vineyard layout, and equipment requirements. Prerequisite: VEN 100 (May be taken concurrently). Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Grape world
2. Grape botany: genus, species, history, taxonomy
3. Costs
4. Grape varietal review
5. Site selection
6. Irrigation
7. Climate
8. Soils
9. Site preparation and planting
10. Phylloxera, Rootstocks and clones
11. Training and Trellising
12. Propagation
13. Cover crops
14. Grafting
15. Yield estimates

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss historical perspective of genus Vitis. (1,2)
2. Plan and equip a new vineyard. (3,4,15)
3. Assess critical site selection elements: heat units, slopes, micro-climates and crop history. (5-9)
4. Apply irrigation methods and timing for grapes. (6,7,15)
5. Propagate grape vines. (10-12,14)
6. Apply post-planting, pest control and cover crops. (10,13)

3
VEN102 Maintain Vinifera Vineyard

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 102. Maintaining a Vinifera Vineyard (3). Maintaining a vineyard from the point of dormancy through the harvest. Emphasis on crop monitoring techniques, pruning methods, bloom, vine manipulation, and determining vine health. Includes the relationship that exists between the grower and the vintner. Prerequisite: VEN 100 (May be taken concurrently). Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Grape Cultivars
2. Vine Nutrition
3. Water Management
4. Canopy Management and Crop Thinning
5. Vineyard Floor Management
6. Pests and Diseases
7. Harvest
8. Balanced Pruning
9. Cold Injury

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify wine grape cultivars. (1)
2. List the nutrients required by grapes for proper growth. (2)
3. Explain how nutrient status is assessed in the vineyard. (2)
4. Calculate how many pounds of fertilizer are needed to supply a particular amount of nutrient to one acre of grapes. (2)
5. Identify the components of a drip irrigation system. (3)
6. Describe the steps in irrigation scheduling and relate the seasonal growth phase of the vine to water requirement. (3)
7. Describe a canopy both in and out of balance. (4)
8. Explain how initial vineyard establishment decisions as well as current cultural management impact canopy balance. (4)
9. Identify the problems associated with over-cropping and under-cropping. (4)
10. Describe the process to identify an unknown pest or cultural problem. (6)
11. Use of a weed identification guide or dichotomous key to identify weeds. (6)
12. Explain the importance of vineyard floor management. (5)
13. List the common diseases and vertebrate and invertebrate pests in the region. (6)
14. Complete a sprayer calibration. (6)
15. List the factors that are considered in order to determine when to harvest grapes.(7)
16. List and explain the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical harvest operation. (7)
17. Describe the effects of fruit quality on wine quality. (7)
18. Explain the process of balanced pruning. (8)
19. Calculate the number of buds to leave based on a pruning weight and pruning formula. (8)
20. Describe the anatomy of the compound bud. (8)
21. Explain the implications of bud anatomy on cold injury management and how cold injury hazard and occurrence impacts pruning decisions. (9)

3
VEN120 Wines of the United States

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 120. Wines of the United States (2). A historical view of wine producing regions and states in the United States including California, Oregon, Washington and New York. Emphasis on the types and varieties of wines and pairing of local foods with local wines. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. One lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of wine in the United States
2. Wine producing states and regions
3. Types and varieties of wine
4. Wine tasting
5. Wine pairing

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the history of wine in the United States. (1)
2. Classify wine by state or region. (2-4)
3. Critique wine by state or region. (2-4)
4. Pair wine with food. (5)

2
VEN121 Wines of the World

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 121. Wines of the World (2). History of the vine, the growth of grapes, and the production of wine throughout the world. Emphasis on classification and critique of Old and New World wines. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. One lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. World history of wine
2. Old World wines
3. New World wines
4. Types and varieties of wine by country and region
5. Wine pairing
6. Wine tasting

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the world history of wine. (1)
2. Classify wine by Old World and New World. (2-4,6)
3. Critique Old and New World wines. (2-4,6)
4. Pair Old and New World wines with food. (5)

2
VEN195E Winemaking Practicum  1

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 195E. Viticulture Practicum (2). Practical experience in winemaking while working at an approved winery and receiving supervision from a professional vintner. Students must complete a fall, spring and summer practicum. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. Four lab. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Berry sampling
2. Winemaking
3. Bottling, labeling, foiling and waxing
4. Chemical analysis
5. Winery sanitation
6. Vineyard and winery operations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Select berry for winemaking. (1,6)
2. Perform wine chemical analysis. (4,6)
3. Produce wine. (2-6)
4. Perform and analyze winery sanitation. (5,6)
5. Implement bottling, labeling and waxing operations. (3,6)

2
AND VEN195E Winemaking Practicum

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 195E. Viticulture Practicum (2). Practical experience in winemaking while working at an approved winery and receiving supervision from a professional vintner. Students must complete a fall, spring and summer practicum. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. Four lab. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Berry sampling
2. Winemaking
3. Bottling, labeling, foiling and waxing
4. Chemical analysis
5. Winery sanitation
6. Vineyard and winery operations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Select berry for winemaking. (1,6)
2. Perform wine chemical analysis. (4,6)
3. Produce wine. (2-6)
4. Perform and analyze winery sanitation. (5,6)
5. Implement bottling, labeling and waxing operations. (3,6)

2
AND VEN195E Winemaking Practicum

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 195E. Viticulture Practicum (2). Practical experience in winemaking while working at an approved winery and receiving supervision from a professional vintner. Students must complete a fall, spring and summer practicum. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. Four lab. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Berry sampling
2. Winemaking
3. Bottling, labeling, foiling and waxing
4. Chemical analysis
5. Winery sanitation
6. Vineyard and winery operations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Select berry for winemaking. (1,6)
2. Perform wine chemical analysis. (4,6)
3. Produce wine. (2-6)
4. Perform and analyze winery sanitation. (5,6)
5. Implement bottling, labeling and waxing operations. (3,6)

2
VEN195V Viticulture Practicum  2

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 195V. Viticulture Practicum (2). Practical experience in vineyard operations partnering with an approved vineyard, Students must complete a fall, spring and summer practicum. Four lab. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Quality Assurance
2. Canopy Management
3. Trellis Systems
4. Harvest Operations
5. Diseases and Pests
6. Lab Analysis
7. Crop Estimates
8. Fertility Plan
9. Petiole Analysis
10. The U or Lyre System

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Assess and maintain crop health. (1-3,8,9)
2. List and describe the characteristics of canopy ideotype. (2,10)
3. Describe and collect fruit samples for harvest parameters. (4)
4. Collect and perform lab analysis. (6)
5. Predict and plot harvest date and crop estimate. (7)
6. Plan and manage proper post-harvest monitoring. (7,8)
7. Manage proper pre-harvest operations. (7,8)
8. Identify major insect and weed pests in a given location. (5)
9. Identify and describe major fungal diseases in a given location. (5)
10. Evaluate existing management strategies for identified pests and diseases. (5)
11. Apply spray schedule to accomplish the goals of a stated pest management program. (5)
12. Discuss the water management strategy at your vineyard site. (1,8)
13. Identify and preform proper suckering and shoot thinning techniques. (1-3,9)
14. Apply proper cluster thinning, shoot positioning and leaf removal techniques. (1-3,9,10)

2
AND VEN195V Viticulture Practicum

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 195V. Viticulture Practicum (2). Practical experience in vineyard operations partnering with an approved vineyard, Students must complete a fall, spring and summer practicum. Four lab. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Quality Assurance
2. Canopy Management
3. Trellis Systems
4. Harvest Operations
5. Diseases and Pests
6. Lab Analysis
7. Crop Estimates
8. Fertility Plan
9. Petiole Analysis
10. The U or Lyre System

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Assess and maintain crop health. (1-3,8,9)
2. List and describe the characteristics of canopy ideotype. (2,10)
3. Describe and collect fruit samples for harvest parameters. (4)
4. Collect and perform lab analysis. (6)
5. Predict and plot harvest date and crop estimate. (7)
6. Plan and manage proper post-harvest monitoring. (7,8)
7. Manage proper pre-harvest operations. (7,8)
8. Identify major insect and weed pests in a given location. (5)
9. Identify and describe major fungal diseases in a given location. (5)
10. Evaluate existing management strategies for identified pests and diseases. (5)
11. Apply spray schedule to accomplish the goals of a stated pest management program. (5)
12. Discuss the water management strategy at your vineyard site. (1,8)
13. Identify and preform proper suckering and shoot thinning techniques. (1-3,9)
14. Apply proper cluster thinning, shoot positioning and leaf removal techniques. (1-3,9,10)

2
AND VEN195V Viticulture Practicum

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 195V. Viticulture Practicum (2). Practical experience in vineyard operations partnering with an approved vineyard, Students must complete a fall, spring and summer practicum. Four lab. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Quality Assurance
2. Canopy Management
3. Trellis Systems
4. Harvest Operations
5. Diseases and Pests
6. Lab Analysis
7. Crop Estimates
8. Fertility Plan
9. Petiole Analysis
10. The U or Lyre System

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Assess and maintain crop health. (1-3,8,9)
2. List and describe the characteristics of canopy ideotype. (2,10)
3. Describe and collect fruit samples for harvest parameters. (4)
4. Collect and perform lab analysis. (6)
5. Predict and plot harvest date and crop estimate. (7)
6. Plan and manage proper post-harvest monitoring. (7,8)
7. Manage proper pre-harvest operations. (7,8)
8. Identify major insect and weed pests in a given location. (5)
9. Identify and describe major fungal diseases in a given location. (5)
10. Evaluate existing management strategies for identified pests and diseases. (5)
11. Apply spray schedule to accomplish the goals of a stated pest management program. (5)
12. Discuss the water management strategy at your vineyard site. (1,8)
13. Identify and preform proper suckering and shoot thinning techniques. (1-3,9)
14. Apply proper cluster thinning, shoot positioning and leaf removal techniques. (1-3,9,10)

2
VEN200 Science of Winemaking I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 200. Science of Winemaking I (3). Winemaking principles of fruit selection, pre-harvest analyses, fruit processing, juice additions, alcoholic and malo-lactic fermentations. Includes winery hygiene and safety. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. Prerequisite: VEN 120 (May be taken concurently). Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Pre-harvest fruit selection and analysis
2 . Winery safety and sanitation
3. Red, white and rosť wine production
4. Alcoholic and malo-lactic fermentations
5. Juice addition calculations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze pre-harvest fruit and juice. (1)
2. Discuss and explain winery safety and sanitation. (2)
3. Describe red, white, and rosť wine grape processing. (3)
4. Define alcoholic and malo-lactic fermentations. (4)
5. Calculate and apply juice additions. (5)

3
VEN201 Science of Winemaking II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 201. Science of Winemaking II (3). Chemistry of winemaking, wine analysis and quality control. Emphasis on wine composition, wine analytical techniques, and the relevance of these analyses to winemaking decisions. Includes wine filtration and post-fermentation wine stewardship. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. Prerequisite: VEN 200. Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Wine chemistry
2. Wine spoilage and quality control
3. Wine analytical techniques
4. Wine filtration and reverse osmosis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze juice for: pH, titratable acidity, percent alcohol, and sulfite and acetic acid concentration. (1)
2. Determine wine spoilage conditions and responsible microbes. (2)
3. Implement wine preservation and quality control. (2)
4. Describe wine filtration, wine filtration systems, and reverse osmosis. (3,4)
5. Explain wine phenolic chemistry and anthocyanin co-pigmentation. (3,4)

3
VEN202 Science of Winemaking III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
VEN 202. Science of Winemaking III (3). Basic sensory science and how sensory evaluation relates to oak barrel selection. Exploration of fining and filtration, blending, wine defects, and compounds responsible for specific aroma and flavor components. Must be 21 years of age or older to enroll. Prerequisite: VEN 201. Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Basic sensory science
2. Wine aromas and defects
3. Post-fermentation winemaking techniques and practices
4. Production of stabilized wine for aging and bottling

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1 Diagnose common wine faults/tasting. (1)
2. Determine primary aroma and flavor compounds. (1)
3 Determine secondary aroma and flavor compounds. (1)
4. Recognize common wine defects and their origin. (2)
5. Calculate and prepare addition trials (acid, fining agents). (3)
6. Diagnose potential wine instabilities and their prevention. (3)
7. Discuss closures and bottling quality control. (4)
8. Describe micro-oxygenation. (4)
9. Use basic barrel flavor chemistry. (3,4)
10. Apply principles of fining and fining agents. (4)
11. Analyze enzymes and their uses. (4)

3
1 - Students must complete VEN 195E in Fall, Spring and Summer for a total of 6 credits
2 - Students must complete VEN 195V in Fall, Spring and Summer for a total of 6 credits

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.